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Lost Innocence #FiveSentenceFiction

Ambrose crept behind stealthily, eyes twinkling mysteriously, tip-toeing to where the sand-castle was being constructed laboriously and with a swift movement, his leg toppled the tower over.

He threw back his head in impish laughter as the cascading sand granules set off horrified pearls of tears to roll down pretty cheeks.

Ambrose’s mother ruffled the little boy’s unruly hair in mock anger; her eyes blinded by love for her child could only sense pure innocence and harmless mischief.

Years later, Ambrose’s sadist eyes laughed uproariously as his impudent hands disrobed a terrified, screaming young lady and outraged her modesty.

As the unrepentant Ambrose stood at the gallows, his old mother grieved the misplaced sense of motherhood that had overlooked sparks of deviance disguised cleverly as innocence.


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Five sentence fiction written in response to the prompt: Grief at LillieMcferrinWrites.

Lillie McFerrin Writes

Comments

  1. You said it. How often we let such 'innocent behaviour' pass.

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    Replies
    1. True but sometimes it is difficult to judge if the act is entirely innocent. Parenting is tough, I'd say, Tulika!

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  2. Very disturbing images you've created there, Uma. Sad to know that impish displays can transform into something so horrific. Great job on the imagery!

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    Replies
    1. Shailaja, I've indeed portrayed an extreme, though not completely untrue, situation. I do feel some psychotic behaviours have a tendency to manifest early and it might be possible to identify them.

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  3. If only mothers chose not to look the other way always. You have nailed it, Uma! I pray that there are more Ambroses in our world.

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    Replies
    1. I'm sure you meant that there are 'no' more Ambroses, Aathira. Yes, it's a wishful thinking and quite a tough scenario for a parent but we could do our bit by being vigilant and objective.

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  4. A good message to parents.Nip the flaws in the bud.

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  5. Well this has a message and it shows the side, the side of blinding love that might overlook early signs...

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    Replies
    1. Exactly, Naba..that's what I was hinting at!

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  6. nicely crafted story , applauds

    My Entry Courage

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    Replies
    1. Thank you, Cifar..humbled by the gesture! :-)

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  7. Parenting cannot afford to be lenient, the earlier you correct, the better.

    Nicely done! The message sent across is strong.

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    Replies
    1. Yes, keirthana..however, parenting is tricky too! thanks :-)

      Delete

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