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Amchi Mumbai or namma Bengalooru?

I had written a post earlier about how I felt about life in Hyderabad as compared to that in Mumbai, my hometown. Now that I am back from Mumbai after a looong vacation, I am inclined towards comparing it with Bangalore, my current home for the past one year. Some random observations, in no particular order, preference or importance:

When I landed in Mumbai, it was hot, humid, sultry and I was sweating like mad. Nothing unusual. Only, I have got used to better weather conditions. Ya, ya, after spending 25 good years in the same weather conditions, how can I say that? My mother felt so too. But..but..one does get used to good things faster, right? Imagine a city, where for most part of the year, you do not need a fan running even in the dead of the afternoon, where, your bag always has a pair of warm clothes for the kid to brace out the cool and windy evenings, where, a light drizzle can bring the temperature notches down on a warm day. Well, you really can't blame me now.

In Mumbai, there was never a day when I left my house without a hanky and a liberal dose of the deo. But Bangalore spoilt me. I used the deo nevertheless but on the days I forgot to, I was not subject to any embarrassment. The hankies lay washed and unused in the cupboard. This time, I realized much to my embarrassment that my favourite deo was incapable of handling the Mumbai weather and lost the battle against the more powerful sweat beads. Then the weather gods took pity on me and sent a week of evening showers accompanied by gusty winds to cool us ( the city and me). I had no reason to complain about the weather for the rest of my vacation. Yes, the deo and the hanky still occupied the top spot but their vain status had dimmed.

Time in Mumbai has two pairs of wings. I had the luxury of waking up late with additional exemption from cooking too. Yet, before I knew it mornings melted into afternoons and soon turned to dark evenings. Blame it on winter or the fast life, I felt I was riding on airplanes called time. Having kids around can also give the same illusion, though (for most part of the day, R had his cousin for company). Bangalore can be fast paced for working people but for me, it is the weekends that fly faster than the weekdays; though life in general is definitely faster than in Hyderabad.

Inspite of being privy to maa ke haath ka khaana (which translates to tasty food), I was eating lesser- which again can be blamed on the climate. I have realized that I have larger portions of meal at Bangalore and eat rather frequently. Hmm, if I need to check my weight anytime in future I better relocate back to Mumbai. Oh hold on! how can I when  awesome chaats and vada pav beckon me from every street corner? I sorely miss them in Bangalore.

An evening walk near my parents house would ensure coming across at least a dozen known faces, most of who will know who you are, whom you married and where you currently reside. So, I would be greeted with a huge smile and the usual and standard questions of "when did you come?" "will you stay longer?" "hows life in xyz city?". When I came back to Bangalore after almost a month, I realized no one at the park area where I meet so called acquaintances would have even missed seeing me around. A boon or a bane, I am not sure.

We came back home on Friday evening and the house felt so empty. The silence was almost deafening. No fights to resolve, no sweet banter of the children, no doting grandma to spoil R with chocolates and kalkanddu (sugar candy) on demand. It was good that weekend began and we had friends to meet. Also, no Monday blues because Tuesday is a state holiday! :-)

Hope you guys had a great Diwali and a lovely weekend...

Comments

  1. Bangalore spoils you, no doubt about that. Recently, over the last 2 years, I have been hearing only bad things about mumbai. 2 of my close friends, both avid mumbaikars who swore they would never leave the city, say it is a dying city and they are seriously thinking of relocating. Of course bangalore is everybody's first choice!
    I've been away so not sure if I missed one of your posts after R's sickness bout. Hope he stayed well and enjoyed the rest of his holiday.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Aparna: yeah..I have been a avid Mumbaikar myself..but not sure if I feel the same anymore..:-(
    R recovered well and was his usual self for the rest of the holiday..:-)
    missed seeing you around..

    ReplyDelete
  3. I could perfectly relate with "I had the luxury of waking up late with additional exemption from cooking too." :-)

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  4. Ah the weather the weather.. I have the same feeling with Chennai vs Bangalore.. after spending just a few years in Bangalore I could no longer manage Chennai summers :( !! But now I've lived in Bangalore longer than in Chennai anyway so am definitely a converted Bangalorean ;) !!

    Was good to see this comparison from you Uma :) it must be tough to come back after a stay with family and lots of people around to a quiet house and just the nuclear family... but Welcome back !!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Tan: what bliss, right?? :-)

    Aparna: chennai summers? chennai climate is either hot or hotter..:-) am en route to getting converted..
    Thanks Aparna!! :-)In a way it feels good to have your "own" routine.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hi Uma,
    Well, i have a lot of friends in bangalore... one thing that keeps them going in this new city(most of my friends are from delhi and are working in bangalore) is the pleasant weather... unlike delhi that has extreme of everything(summers, winters, rains.. everything is in excess here)!! I really envy them for that...
    "We get used to good things faster", completely agree with this... Nice post.. :)

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  7. I don't knw what to say. I have come to Pune from Bangalore.
    Climate and all is ok. But, sometimes I miss the local spell.
    Good comparison Uma. I liked the way you said 'Bangalore spoiled me'LOL

    ReplyDelete
  8. Radhika: well, you can relocate to B'lore too..:-)


    Sahana: Pune is, I have heard, in many ways similar to Hyderabad. Depending on the place you stay, you may have to deal with more natives than migrants. Hope you are settling down well. Do write what you feel about the relocation..:-)

    ReplyDelete
  9. hmmmm... what to say... sometimes we like all the noise and crowd, the sweat and heat. on other days you long for that 'quiet'..:) my memories of mumbai,b'lore and hyd are fast fading.. chennai has grown into me.. but there r days i've yearned to go back to b'lore..

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  10. Vidya: seriously! and what you say about the city growing into you is also true..only you need to let it..:-)
    maybe you should consider coming to B'lore???

    ReplyDelete
  11. @Uma As long as my company does not relocate me, i am happy with delhi.. :) Moreover, my friends envy me even more... bcz i have got a job in my hometown, i am living with my family... hence i do not face problems that arise while living alone

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  12. Radhika: hmm..but sometimes, living alone also teaches you something about life that living with parents doesn't..just my thoughts..:-)

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  13. Haven't ever lived in Bangalore but have really loved the weather - at all times of the year. I hate being locked in a room- whic a Delhi weather mandates mostly. It's either too hot or too cold- just a few precious months when you can enjoy your balcony and the sun- like now :)

    ReplyDelete
  14. Minal: Me too. At the moment I am craving for some sunshine here..almost holed up in the house..:-(
    Thanks for visiting this space..:-)

    ReplyDelete

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